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Suhana Meharchand Bio, Wiki, Age, Nationality, Parents, Daughter, Married, CBC, Health, Salary, Today

Suhana Meharchand Biography – Wiki

Suhana Meharchand is a South African born lady working in America as a news anchor. She is a CBC News Network anchor and also the host of CBC News Now on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Suhana Meharchand Age

Suhana was born on 22 April 1962, in Durban, South Africa. She turned 57 years old as in 2019. She celebrates her birthday on the 22nd of April every year.

Suhana Meharchand Nationality

Suhana was born in South Africa but has Canadian nationality.

Suhana Meharchand Early Life And Education

Meharchand was born in Durban, South Africa, and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She is a graduate of broadcast journalism from Toronto’s Ryerson University. Suhana immigrated to Canada in 1968. Meharchand’s career in journalism was inspired by an uncle who ran an underground newspaper in her motherland, South Africa.

Suhana Meharchand Parents

She has not revealed any details regarding her parents. This field will be updated as soon as information is available from a reliable source.

Suhana Meharchand Married | Spouse | Husband

Meharchand was formerly engaged to former Citytv political journalist and Toronto City Councillor named Adam Vaughan. In an interview for the Toronto Star, Suhana commented on their relationship, saying “he gave too many answers but did not ask enough questions”. Together they have a daughter, named Mimi.

Before that, she was married to Ron Clarkin. The two were blessed with two children, namely Mariah and Acton. On April 4, 2016, she revealed on Twitter that she is battling breast cancer.

Suhana Meharchand Children|Daughter

Susan has three children, one with her second husband Adam Vaughan named Mimi and other two children with her former husband Ron Clarkin namely Mariah and Acton.

Suhana Meharchand Career CBC

Meharchand’s first jobs as a journalist were at the CHCH-TV, a TV station in Hamilton, Ontario and at CBET in Windsor, Ontario. Suhana later moved to Ottawa where she stayed for a period of three years as a general reporter and weekend anchor at CJOH-TV, a CTV affiliate. From September 1987 up to July 1989, she was host and producer of What’s New, CBC-TV’s national news including current affairs programs for young people.

Meharchand subsequently became the anchor of the Saturday Evening News broadcast in the Toronto-London-Windsor region. In September 1995, Suhana was appointed anchor of the CBC’s regional newscast on CBLT in Toronto. She replaced Bill Cameron who had moved to Halifax to anchor CBC Newsworld’s morning telecast. In September 2000, she became the anchor of the 11 PM newscast.

Suhana has received two Gemini Award nominations for her work and has won many international awards for documentary work, which include awards from the Columbus International Film & Video Festival and the New York Film and TV Festival. Meharchand is the recipient of a Paul Harris Fellowship awarded by Rotary International and an Honorary Member of the Canadian Women’s Foundation. She actively supports Performers for Literacy, Gems of Hope, the Redwood Shelter for Women and also Children, the Canadian Paraplegic Association, The Hospital for Sick Children and also the Princess Margaret Breast Cancer Centre.

Suhana Meharchand Health

In 2016, Suhana revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She shared her battle on Twitter, stating that ‘it is very tough going.’

Suhana Meharchand Salary

There are no details showing her annual or monthly earnings. Her salary figures will be updated as soon as they are available.

Suhana Meharchand Net Worth

Suhana has not yet revealed her net worth. We will update this section when we get and verify information about the wealth and properties under her name.

Suhana Meharchand Height | Weight

There is no known information concerning Suhana’s height and weight as she prefers keeping it personal and out of the limelight. However, she has an admirable height and body measurements. This field will be updated as soon as information from a reliable source is available.

Suhana Meharchand Today

Suhana Meharchand is working in America as a news anchor. She is a CBC News Network anchor and also the host of CBC News Now on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Suhana Meharchand Weight Loss

Common weight-loss mistakes

Common Weight-loss Mistakes: #1 Dieting

CBC’s Cross Country Checkup Caller:
Melanie Oates from St. John’s Newfoundland
Listen at 17:50

Melanie Oates:
I was a teen who dieted a lot and that diet parlayed into a pretty severe eating disorder. And so I think targeting teens (by encouraging dieting via free access to Weight Watchers) is severely dangerous.

Suhana Meharchand from CBC’s Cross Country Checkup:
Is it important for teens to know what a calorie is? …

Melanie Oates:
I think the problem more so than learning what a calorie is and learning how to restrict your food… is that Canada has an obsession with diet culture. So I think the solution could lie in teaching teens about celebrating body types and focusing more on hobbies and interests and their passions. You know, when I was a teenager with an eating disorder, I found myself at 20 years old, at university. And I had no idea what I was interested in or what I was passionate about because I wasted all those years obsessed with dieting.

Take-away message:
Melanie Oates experience mirrors mine. I dropped out of everything to focus on weight loss. I thought it would help me get healthy faster. Not only did giving up all the things I loved give me more time to run in the wrong direction, but when I finally got healthy I felt completely lost. After teaching for a while I developed The Who Is NOBODY? Program that helps kids figure out their interests and experience using them to help others. This project teaches youth to value themselves for their actions. I also agree with Melanie that dieting isn’t the answer. A healthy body is a reflection of a healthy habits.

Common Weight-loss Mistakes: #2 Yo yo dieting

CBC’s Cross Country Checkup Caller:
Barb from Whitby
Listen at 38: 10

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Barb:
My sweetie and I decided to do a lifestyle change about 6 years ago… it was time to be healthier and feel better… I spent most of my adult life doing the diet thing… but I always gained back more than I lost… it just kept piling on. So we decided to have a lifestyle change.

We cut out processed foods. There are some foods that we brought back in. We did our own tomatoes one year but it was too much effort. So we use canned tomatoes now when we make tomato sauce… and we introduced exercise. We both started walking. It was one thing I knew I could do and I could keep up with. I refused to cut out butter. I refused to cut out wine. And I like rye once in a while so I had ginger ale and not the diet kind… everything in moderation.

Take-away message:
Barb gives a lot of insight. I love that she chose to change her lifestyle rather than go on yet another diet. She wanted the weight loss to be permanent so she made choices she could keep up permanently. I also like that she gave up most processed foods; they have tons of additives that keep you feeling hungry. Barb explains they went back to canned tomatoes after making their own tomato sauce. This is key! It’s important Barb didn’t give up her whole weight-loss approach because one thing wasn’t working. (Personally, I don’t consider canned tomatoes processed anyways!) Like Barb, I believe you have to eat as naturally as possible without getting fanatical about it. She is also wise for staying away from diet pop.

Common Weight-loss Mistakes: #3 Fixating on numbers

CBC’s Cross Country Checkup Caller:
Caitlin Edmonds, Courtland, Ontario
Listen at 41:30

Caitlin:
The problem that I personally have with Weight Watchers is that I struggled with an eating disorder in my past. Companies like Weight Watchers say they promote health and that they’re not about weight and numbers. But they still are about weight and numbers. People go in weekly to be weighed. They count points. While this can help people lose weight it drives an unhealthy relationship with numbers. Your health isn’t just determined by your weight. There are lots of indicators of health.

Suhana Meharchand, CBC’s Cross Country Checkup:
What was it that changed the way you look at those numbers?

Caitlin:
At first I was looking at them like this was something in my life that I can control in a time when everything felt out of control. But then it started to get to a point that it was taking over my entire life and I couldn’t accomplish other things. So my view on these numbers changed because they were very restricting and all I cared about. I knew if I wanted to go on to accomplish other things in my life I needed to focus on my health and not worry about a number.

Take-away message:
Caitlin’s story and turning point really resonated with me. There’s such a push for rigid dieting when healthy eating isn’t that exact. For instance, I eat roughly balanced meals each day. Roughly balanced is good enough. And good enough has allowed me to maintain a healthy weight for 18 years. Just like Caitlin, I got better when I focused on being healthy instead of thin.

Common Weight-loss Mistakes: #4 Making a dramatic change

CBC’s Cross Country Checkup Host:
Suhana Meharchand, Toronto
Listen at 1:24:50

Suhana Meharchand:
We’re talking about why as a nation we’re piling on the pounds and how we can best shift some of our weight… but that is costing us dearly… We are a wealthy, educated country so why are we failing to take heed of the messages of the health professionals? What can we do about this obesity issue in Canada?… I know the information but I’m not doing it. I know not to eat potato chips. Am I just dumb?

Take-away message:
Having the right information isn’t enough. You also need a strategy to turn unhealthy habits into healthy habits. You can’t go from eating diet food or processed food to suddenly having healthy habits. It’s important to make change slowly with baby steps. Then change is lasting.

Common Weight-loss Mistakes: #5 NOT moving your body

CBC’s Cross Country Checkup Caller:
Buck Miller, Huntsville, Ontario
Listen at 1:26:10

Buck:
I drive out of town to go ice fishing with my daughter. Then I park and start walking up the trail (to go ice fishing). It’s only a few hundred meters. And there’s a guy who is riding his ski-doo the same distance… The further north you go the more you’re looked at as crazy if you use human power… I lived up north and biked to work (only 800 meters) and many times I was asked if I lost my license for drinking and driving.

Take-away message:
Buck shares an important piece of the puzzle. We need to move our bodies each day. Just a little activity triggers incredible things. Being physically active gets your heart pumping, jump starts your metabolism and clears your head. Moving your body also moves waste and toxins out of your body, which makes you feel better. Exercise creates a positive domino effect. I love that Buck isn’t saying buy a gym membership. Buck is simply suggesting you incorporate movement in what you’re already doing.In my case I exercised too much and often did extra exercise. This common weight-loss mistake makes it difficult to lose weight.
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In Summary:

I’m thrilled CBC’s Cross Country Checkup asked why people who live in a wealthy, educated country are not healthy. This phone-in highlights a disconnect. My experience bridges the gap.

I struggled with my weight, and all 5 common weight-loss mistakes discussed in this post. Why? There’s so much complicated information out there. We’ve lost sight of the basics; information that took me 10 years to re-learn. Weight loss is natural when we:

Eat roughly balanced meals made mostly of whole foods and exercise moderately.
Make this change lasting by turning unhealthy habits into healthy habits gradually.

Common weight-loss mistakes come from misinformation.
Misinformation comes from complicated weight-loss methods.
Making weight loss complicated is the underlying issue of Canada’s weight problem.

The more resources you have, the easier it is to complicate weight loss. This truth explains why Gwyneth Paltrow, Oprah, Tina Fey and people in developed countries all struggle with common weight-loss mistakes. The diet industry knows we have money to spend on fancy diets, exercise regimes and everything from kitchen and gym equipment to weight-loss magazines.

Ignore complicated weight-loss methods! Simplify reaching and maintaining a healthy weight.

Build healthy eating and exercise habits. A healthy weight will follow.

Next Steps:
Are you practicing any of these common weight-loss mistakes? It’s hard to stop cold turkey. You aren’t a robot! For instance, if you’re fixated on numbers and weigh yourself 14 times this week, make your goal to weigh yourself 13 times next week. Don’t try to make dramatic change. Sign up for my newsletter (below) and you’ll receive one of the best strategies I’ve learned.

Don’t run away from your unhealthy habits. Walk away. Take baby steps toward healthy eating and exercise choices.

“Walk away, walk away girl, if you know what’s good for you.”

From https://www.the10principles.com/

Frequently Asked Questions About Suhana Meharchand

Who is Suhana?

Suhana Meharchand is a South African born lady working in America as a news anchor. She is a CBC News Network anchor and also the host of CBC News Now on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

How old is Suhana?

Suhana was born on 22 April 1962, in Durban, South Africa. She turned 57 years old as in 2019. She celebrates her birthday on the 22nd of April every year.

How tall is Suhana?

There is no known information concerning Suhana’s height and weight as she prefers keeping it personal and out of the limelight. However, she has an admirable height and body measurements. This field will be updated as soon as information from a reliable source is available.

Is Suhana married?

Meharchand was formerly engaged to former Citytv political journalist and Toronto City Councillor named Adam Vaughan. In an interview for the Toronto Star, Suhana commented on their relationship, saying “he gave too many answers but did not ask enough questions”. Together they have a daughter, named Mimi.

Before that, she was married to Ron Clarkin. The two were blessed with two children, namely Mariah and Acton. On April 4, 2016, she revealed on Twitter that she is battling breast cancer.

How much is Suhana worth?

Suhana has not yet revealed her net worth. We will update this section when we get and verify information about the wealth and properties under her name.

Where does Suhana live?

Because of security reasons, Suhana has not shared her precise location of residence. We will immediately update this information if we get the location and images of her house.

Is Suhana dead or alive?

She is alive. In 2016, Suhana revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She shared her battle on Twitter, stating that ‘it is very tough going.’

Where Is Suhana Meharchand?

Suhana Meharchand is working in America as a news anchor. She is a CBC News Network anchor and also the host of CBC News Now on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Is Suhana Meharchand Sick Again?

In 2016, Suhana revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She shared her battle on Twitter.

What Happened To Suhana Meharchand?

In 2016, she revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She shared her battle on Twitter.

Suhana Meharchand Twitter

Tweets by CBCSuhana